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 6 Train Tablet        6 Train Sign

 

For photos please see www nycsubway.org 

Manhattan Tile Band 

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CITY HALL

City Hall  located underneath City Hall Park , opened on 10/27/1904 and closed on 12/31/1945. It is very ornate and has one track and a five car platform. It was closed for safety reasons. Please see www.nycsubway.org and Brennan’s page for more information on this station. Officially 6 trains are emptied at Brooklyn Bridge and run light through the loop and is part of the original IRT route from 1904. The original route ran from City Hall to North of 33rd Street, via today’ shuttle to  Times Square and then via the 1 train to 145th Street and Broadway with a branch diverging at 96th Street to 180th Street Bronx Park on today's 2 train

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BROOKLYN BRIDGE

Brooklyn Bridge located underneath City Hall Park at Park Row) opened on 10/27/1904 and is discussed on the complexes page 

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WORTH STREET

Worth Street opened on10/27/1904 and closed on 09/01/1962. It  was closed when the Brooklyn Bridge station was lengthened northward to allow abandonment  of the gap fillers at the south end of Brooklyn Bridge which was briefly renamed as Brooklyn Bridge Worth Street before assuming its present name. Worth Street had two wall platforms holding five cars and four tracks. The southbound platform was lengthened

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CANAL STREET

 

Canal Street (on Lafayette Street at Canal Street) is described on the Complexes Page 

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SPRING STREET

Spring Street (on Lafayette Street at Spring Street) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms  

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BLEECKER STREET

Bleecker Street on Lafayette Street at Bleecker Street) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms. It is now part of the Bleecker Street/Broadway Lafayette Complex

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ASTOR PLACE

Astor Place on Lafayette Street at Astor Place) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms which are offset. This is home of the beaver to commemorate John Jacob Astor who was a fur trader. This station has been renovated and features artwork by Milton Glasser, installed in 1986.. According to Joe Cunningham, this station had beavers all over the tile but were removed when customers thought the beavers to be rats. This station has a secondary name of Cooper Union. 

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14 STREET

UNION SQUARE

14th Street Union Square opened on 10/27/1904 and is described on the Complexes Page  

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18 STREET

18th Street on Park Avenue South at 18th Street, opened 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two short five car wall platforms. It was closed 11/08/1948 to speed service since it is close to Union Square. For more information and photos see www.nycsubway.org and Brennan’s page. 

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23 STREET

23rd Street on Park Avenue South at East 23rd Street) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms and has vent chambers. There is no crossover or crossunder. It is partially renovated with an ornate north end with tiled I-beams and low curtain walls between all tracks. The art is entitled “Long Division” by Valerie Jaudon installed in 1988 

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28  STREET

28th Street (on Park Avenue South at East 28th Street) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms and has no open crossover or crossunder but does have a sealed crossunder closed due to crime concerns. It has glass block walls at the north end on both platforms. There is a high ceiling in the center. Tablets spell out the name as Twenty-Eighth Street. 

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33  STREET

33rd Street (on Park Avenue at East 33rd Street) opened on 10/27/1904 and has four tracks and two wall platforms. It has been renovated and features a retro look. The eagle plaques are for the armory nearby. The local track is higher than the express tracks. The art is the seat loops by James Garvey. An was installed in 1996. 

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42  STREET

GRAND CENTRAL

42nd Street Grand Central  opened on 07/17/1918 and is described on the Complexes Page. Leaving here the line becomes two levels with the express on the lower level.  

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51 STREET

 

51st Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 51st Street) IRT opened on 07/27/1918 and is described on the Complexes Page

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59  STREET

 

59th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 59th Street) local opened on 07/17/1918 and the express opened on 11/15/1962. It is described on the Complexes Page. 

 

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68 STREET

HUNTER COLLEGE

 

68th Street Hunter College (on Lexington Avenue at East 68th Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has two tracks and two wall platforms along with emergency exits from the express underneath. The north end has a high ceiling. There is a crossover with windows allowing a view of the trains. This station needs TLC. And  was possibly the very first station renovated in 1982.  Stairs at south-west side blended in with one of the entrances to Hunter College upstairs, and was redone after the renovation. 

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77  STREET

 

77th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 77th Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has two tracks and two wall platforms along with emergency exits from the express underneath. It has been renovated by NYCT in house contract. It has a crossover and has a secondary name of Lenox Hill Hospital. It has vent chambers. A newsstand is on the southbound platform. 

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86  STREET

86th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 86th Street) opened on 07/17/1918 and has two tracks and two wall platforms on each level. It has been renovated by NYCT in house contract. There is no crossover or crossunder. Fare control is on the platform level.  Artwork by Peter Sis is etched stone and mosaic. Installed in  2004 it is entitled "Happy City." The art  has neighborhood buildings as the pupils of the eyes and eyelashes and figurative elements of neighborhood diversity and energy as the white of the eyes.

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96  STREET

96th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 96th Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has two tracks and two wall platforms along with emergency exits from the express underneath. There is a crossover featuring windows overlooking the tracks and an emergency exit from the express underneath on each platform, It has been renovated and features artwork by Laura Bradley entitled “City Suite” installed in 1994. The south end has a tube design due to hydraulic problems encountered during construction (SOURCE: Joe Cunningham). It has been renovated and has art entitled “To Nitza “  by Neo Borikéo  installed in 1990.

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103 STREET

103rd Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 103rd Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has four tracks and two wall platforms and has a crossover . It has beige wall tiles over the original white tiles. There is a closed newsstand in the station.

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110  STREET

110th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 110th Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has four tracks and two wall platforms and has no crossover or crossunder .Artwork is entitled “Sabado en La Ciento Diez” (Saturday on 110th Street) by Manuel Vega installed in 1997. Leaving here the express again descends. 

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116 STREET

116th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 116th Street) opened on 07/27/1918 and has two tracks and two wall platforms along with emergency exits from the express underneath. This station is being renovated by NYCT in house contract and has no crossover or crossunder.  According to the MTA site artwork is by Robert Blackburn and installed in 2005. It is Glass mosaic on platform walls. It is entitled In Everything there is a Season. Robert Blackburn's dynamic abstract patterns rendered in mosaic suggests the color and movement of the streets above that the artist shapes into beautiful artwork for the subway station. A master printmaker, Blackburn was a founding member of the Printmaking Workshop in Harlem. In 2001 MTA Arts for Transit commissioned Blackburn to create a work for the 116th Street subway station in Harlem. In failing health, he chose artist Mei-Tei-Sing Smith, a Bearden Fellow at the Printmaking Workshop, to assist him on what would prove to be his last major project. Once completed, his maquettes were enlarged and manufactured into ceramic and glass mosaics. Blackburn died in April 2003. 

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125 STREET

125th Street (on Lexington Avenue at East 125th Street) opened on 07/17/1918 and has two tracks and an island platform on each level. The upper level is for northbound trains, while the lower level is for Manhattan bound trains. This station has been renovated for the second time in 15 years. On the upper level The West track is used by the 6 train and the East track by the 4 train and the 5 train. The positions on the  lower level are switched, with the 4 train and 5 train using the west track and the 6 train using the east track. this station is ADA accessible, with an elevator from the Northeast corner of 125th Street and Lexington Avenue to mezzanine level and a three stop elevator inside fare control to both platforms. The second and most recent renovation added a staircase from the Northern part of mezzanine downstairs  to the first platform. Artwork installed in 1986 is by Houston Conwill and is entitled " The Open Secret." It is a bronze relief. It features community history, sacred spaces as they relate to African American exploration and the quest for equality. 

Bronx Tile Band

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138 STREET

third avenue

138th Street Third Avenue (on Alexander Avenue at East 138th Street) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and is fairly deep with a high ceiling. North exit with crossunder leads to 138th street and Alexander while the South exit leads to 138th Street and Third Avenue. The booth is at the North end. Both platforms have long closed stairways at the south end. The South mezzanine has new lights. 

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BROOK AVENUE

Brook Avenue (On East 138th Street at Brook Avenue) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with no crossover or crossunder. The station has vent chambers. Booths are on the platform level of both platforms. 

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CYPRESS AVENUE

Cypress Avenue  (on East 138th Street at Cypress Avenue) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with no crossover or crossunder The station has vent chambers. Booths are on the platform level of both platforms.

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EAST 143 STREET

ST MARY'S  STREET

 

East 143rd Street St Mary’s Street (on Southern Boulevard at East 143rd Street) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with no crossover or crossunder. The station has vent chambers. Booths are on the platform level of both platforms. 

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EAST 149  STREET

 

East 149th Street (on Southern Boulevard at East 149th Street) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with no crossover or crossunder. The station has vent chambers. Booths are on the platform level of both platforms. 

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Longwood avenue

 

Longwood Avenue (on Southern Boulevard at Longwood Avenue) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with no crossover or crossunder. Booths are on the platform level of both platforms, Vent chambers are over the tracks. There is a possible closed exit at the South end southbound.  

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hunts point  avenue

Hunts Point Avenue (On Southern Boulevard at Hunts Point Avenue) opened on 01/17/1919 and has three tracks and two island platforms there is a crossover at both ends there is an extra exit at the South end southbound leading to a high exit to the bus lanes. This is the last subway stop. We become an el. The exit at south end is new, was added sometime in the mid-1990s as an easier exit to board one of the 3 bus lines in the area.  There never was a exit at the Manhattan-bound sideFrom the next station up to and including St Lawrence are metal and windscreens are of the Tudor style

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Whitlock avenue

Whitlock Avenue (On Westchester Avenue at Whitlock Avenue) opened 05/30/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder. Canopies are metal and the mezzanine has windows.

 Artwork is by Barbara Grygutis and is entitled Bronx River View, 2010.Stainless steel sculptural seating and windscreen inspired by the location of the Whitlock Avenue station, Bronx River View consists of five stainless steel sculptural units situated on the platforms and integrated into the windscreen walls. From floor to ceiling, the sculptures offer views to the Bronx neighborhood and the nearby Concrete Plant Park and Bronx River. The functional sculptures blend the transit experience with the surrounding community and provide resting points with windows of open air and sky views. Bronx River View creates an environment to inspire dialogue based on the old and new and the traditional and contemporary.

There is no windscreen at the ends. Leaving here there is a 25 mph curve. As we leave Whitlock and the curve,  we see railroad tracks below Westchester Avenue and next to the Sheridan Expressway. These tracks are for Amtrak trains heading to/from Westchester County and points North. There was a station outside serving the tracks used by Amtrak  near Westchester Avenue. It was abandoned a long time ago .

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elder avenue

Elder Avenue (On Westchester Avenue at Elder Avenue) opened 05/30/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder Canopies are metal and the mezzanine has windows. There is no windscreen at the ends. Artwork is by

Jean Whitesavage and Nick Lyle and is entitled Bronx Trees, 2011.It features wrought steel sculptural grilles in platform windscreens.

Bronx Trees consist of 20 hand wrought steel sculptural grilles, representing a number of the native tree species of the Bronx River area. Installed within the platform windscreen, the grilles provide views to the buildings, streets and neighborhood below. Branches and leaves lend a treetop feeling to the view.

The Southbound platform displays grilles based on leaves and branches of the Shagbark Hickory tree (Carya ovate) and the Sassafras (Sassafras albidum). The Northbound platform includes grilles based on leaves and branches of Sumac (Rhus typhina), Swamp White Oak (Quercus bicolor), Tulip (Liriodendron tulipifera) and Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica) trees. These trees were common in the forest that covered the Bronx until the mid -19th century when land development began for the creation of farms, highways, and industry. Today, various local organizations are working to replant native plants, revive the waterways and bring back a bit of the forest.

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Morrison-

SOUNDVIEW AVENUES

Morrison- Soundview Avenues (On Westchester Avenue at Morrison Avenue) opened 05/30/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder Canopies are wood and the mezzanine has windows. There is no windscreen at the ends. Artwork is by Maria Cristalli and Marc Brown and is entitled  The Land Between Two Waters, 2010. It is Forged steel windscreen. Rendered in forged steel, The Land Between Two Waters consists of 14 panels in seven pairs that are integrated into the stations platform windscreens. The images evoke the nearby rivers and other elements of the landscape, both natural and constructed, associated with the history and evolution of the area.

Soundview is located near the point where the Bronx River flows into the East River and was once known as the "Land by the Two Waters" by the native Siwanoy people. With water as a central element, the artists depict a forest of native trees (oak, tulip tree, cottonwood, mountain ash, sweet maple, sassafras, and flowering dogwood) and birds (wild pheasant, osprey, great egret, cedar waxwing, cardinal, and grey catbird). Other panels farmland and the contemporary cityscape of homes, bridges, and distant skylines. Throughout, however, the artists compel us to view ourselves in an urban environment that is not separate from but is part of the natural landscape and its evolution.

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ST LAWRENCE avenue

St Lawrence Avenue (on Westchester Avenue at Saint Lawrence Avenue) opened 05/30/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder Canopies are wood and the mezzanine has windows. There is no windscreen at the ends. Artwork is by Alison Moritsugu and is entitled Community (Acer rubrum, Rosa palustris, Smilax rotundifolia, Carya cordiformis), 2011. It is Glass mosaic in platform windscreens

Alison Moritsugu's mosaics intertwine two definitions of the word community. Community speaks of both people living in a specific geographic area as well as plants growing together, sharing the same ecosystem. The glass mosaics highlight four plants endemic to the Bronx area. They include Acer rubrum (red maple), Carya cordiformis (bitternut hickory), Rosa palustris (swamp rose), and Smilax rotundifolia (common greenbrier). Woven into the background are images of the people who form the Bronx community. They live and work in the area and are the people we see and travel with each day. Once the hunting grounds for the early Siwanoy Indians, this area became farmland and later residential developments. Like the natural landscape, populations are continually changing and always in flux.

 

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PARKCHESTER

EAST 177 STREET

 

Parkchester East 177th Street (on Hugh J. Grant Circle/ Westchester Avenue , one block East of White Plains Road) opened 05/30/1920 and has three tracks and two island platforms with a crossunder. Fare control is at street level In a massive stucco station house.  The station also has an upper mezzanine which has been reduced in size. Canopies are metal.  The station has a grand stairway to the upper mezzanine and Is slated for ADA access. The station signs and map now read "Parkchester", the East 177th Street was dropped not too long ago.  East 177th Street was the cross street before the Cross-Bronx Expressway was built in the 1950's.  It is home to the city's first private housing community, Parkchester Apartment Complex, first opened in 1940.  Artwork is by  William Low and is entitled A Day in Parkchester, 2011. It is Faceted glass on stairwell.

A Day in Parkchester, created by artist William Low, features two picturesque, iconic day and night scenes of the neighborhood with a day and night view. Fabricated into 40 faceted glass panels, the monumental 11 feet high windows are located in the two stairwells leading from the mezzanine to the platform, filling the space with light and color.

The main characters are the sun and the moon, placed high above the Bronx cityscape with rolling hills, beautiful old apartment buildings, and green parks. Intrigued by the idea that commuters pass by the windows at different times of the day and the effect of the changing light from morning to night, Low created the artwork with the idea in mind that commuters pass by the windows at different times of the day. Light and the location became both the subject matter and focal point. The windows capture the daily light beautifully throughout the day, receiving the stronger daytime rays in the morning and the softer light in the evening hours. The colorful glass provides commuters with the opportunity to view and enjoy its effect throughout the day.

Low was born and raised in the Bronx and was inspired by the station design, and incorporated elements of the original mosaic frieze into his work. The artist has fond memories of riding the subway while growing up in the Bronx.

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CASTLE HILL AVENUE

Castle Hill Avenue (on Westchester Avenue at Castle Hill Avenue) opened on 10/24/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder. At the North end there is a sharp 20 mph curve. There is no windscreen at the ends. The mezzanine is wood and has windows

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ZEREGA AVENUE

Zerega Avenue (on Westchester Avenue at Zerega Avenue) opened on 10/24/1920 and has opened on 12/20/1920 and three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder.  The mezzanine is wood and has windows. 

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WESTCHESTER SQUARE
EAST TREMONT AVENUE

Westchester Square East Tremont Avenue   (on Westchester Avenue at East Tremont Avenue) opened on 10/24/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder.  It offers a view of the Bronx Whitestone Bridge to our East. Canopies are metal and has been renovated The windscreen has some glass block walls and is also broken up by mesh panels. This station is very nice. There is no windscreen at the ends .Artwork is by Romare Bearden and is entitled City of Glass, 1993 (Proposal created by artist, 1982)

Faceted glass triptych over stairway. The hundreds of brilliant facets of Romare Bearden's glass triptych pulsate with energy, connected by the black thread of a subway train wending past tenements and skyscrapers. The work began as a collage maquette; this was then transformed into a glowing artwork in jewel-like colored glass. The three-paneled work is installed on the wall at the stairway landing.

Bearden was an accomplished artist and City of Light skillfully weaves together the spirit found in his beloved music, social concerns, and interest in trains. The work was the result of a collaboration between Bearden and the fabricators, Benoit Gilsoul and Helmut Schardt. Following the artist's death in 1988, they were able to complete the work from the preparatory studies and instructions he had left behind.

Between Westchester Square  and Middletown Road, there is the Westchester subway yard. It houses all 6 trains stored in this yard. A flyover is on the s/b local track and meets up with the yard track.

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MIDDLETOWN ROAD

 

Middletown Road (on Westchester Avenue at Middletown Road) opened on 12/20/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder. The station has just had new lights installed. Canopies are wood as is the mezzanine.

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BUHRE AVENUE

Buhre Avenue (on Westchester Avenue at Buhre Avenue) opened on 12/20/1920 and has three tracks and two wall platforms with a crossunder. To answer a question that is often asked, the name rhymes with “pure”. The station has new sodium lights and now windscreen at the ends. Canopies and mezzanine are wood.

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PELHAM BAY PARK

 

Pelham Bay Park (on Westchester Avenue at Pelham Bay Park) opened on 12/20/1920 and has two tracks, two closed wall platforms and an island platform Canopies are wood, as is the mezzanine which has a crossover at the north end. The station has full ADA, which the mezzanine also was renovated at the same time when the elevator to Buckner Boulevard was built. It is a major bus transfer point as buses to Co-op City and Orchard Beach (Summer only) stop outside this station.

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