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Queens Tile band

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711th  AVENUE CONTINENTAL AVENUE

FOREST HILLS

 

71st Avenue Continental Avenue Forest Hills (Queens Blvd @ 71st Ave/108th Street) Opened 12/13/1936:  Express stop, 4 tracks on 2 island platforms, and is the terminus of R, and  M,   There are 3 fare control areas along full width mezzanine.  2 of the 3 fare control areas are near each other along wraparound passageway outside of fare control. The F/T booth is near the east end and is closest to 71st Ave/Queens Blvd staircase on south side.  The other P/T booth in the same area is in the middle and is closest to 108th street71st Avenue.  It is open during AM rush hours, other times; a couple of HEETs can be used.  The other P/T booth at the far west end is at 70th Road/Queens Blvd and has only one street stair.  There are 7 street stairs to each platform.  On the platform, the platform wall has green tile band with black border.  Facing the express tracks are the vintage 1936 white signs with black lettering "  Contin-ental Ave Forest Hills" .A renovated and expanded tower is at the far eastern end of the Jamaica-bound platform, another mini-tower also sits on the center of the Manhattan-bound platform but it is seldom used.  Before we enter this station, there are a set of tracks rising from the lower level, one for each direction.  These tracks are used for local trains relaying back downtown, as well as yard moves to the massive Jamaica Yard facility nearby.  They come up and merge with both local and express tracks in “Y” track configuration.  It  is slated to be a key ADA station .

Between 67th Avenue and Roosevelt Ave/Jackson Heights, we see bellmouths of varying degrees.  What is known is that the IND's second system plans were to build a new line extension to Far Rockaway (way before the 1950 LIRR fire), and take over the LIRR operations via. a spur from the Queens Blvd along the present abandoned ROW.  What makes this part of the line so interesting is the number of bellmouths in this area, at least 4 bellmouths, plus a ramp to the lower level at Roosevelt Ave terminal, were noted during the course of this ride.  Under normal conditions, we would only expect to see 2 bellmouths

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67th AVENUE

 

 

67th Avenue (67th Avenue and Queens Blvd) opened 12/13/1936:  Local stop, 4 tracks and 2 side platforms.  Tile band on these stations are light shades of blue.  There are 6 stairs to each platform, plus full length mezzanine with crossover allowed.  The P/T entrance at eastern end has ghost booth, F/T side is at western end.  Each fare control has 2 street stairs, one for each side of Queens Blvd that allow underpass usage without paying a fare

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63rd  DRIVE

REGO PARK 

63rd Drive Rego Park (63rd drive/Junction Blvd and Queens Blvd) Opened 12/13/1936:  Like 67th Avenue, there is a full length mezzanine, however crossover inside fare control is only allowed at the westernmost staircase only.  Another local stop with the usual 4 tracks and 2 side platforms, there are a total of 4 fare control areas, 2 exit only, 1 F/T and 1 part time.  The 2 exit only staircases are at the far western end at platform level, and one for each side.  The Manhattan-bound side of the exit only staircase not only leads to Sears, and other stores upstairs, but also shows evidence of a ghost booth here.  The F/T side is on 63rd Drive and has 2 street stairs, one for each side on Queens Blvd (this affords a safe underpass outside fare control, for those who don't like crossing Queens Blvd.).  The south staircase is closest to the Q53 Triboro Coach Bus route to Rockaway Park.  The P/T side at 64th Road has ghost booth and the same 2 street stairs. The underpass to avoid crossing Queens Blvd is available at both ends.

As we travel from 63rd Drive to Woodhaven Blvd, our next stop we quickly see a bellmouth out.  This leads to the planned Winfield/Rockaway spur as part of the IND's never-built second system.  This area will never ever be built again, the residual effects of the 1929-1940's Great Depression, and World War II, forced this and other planned IND extensions on permanent hold.  We can also see further evidence of the IND Rockaway line in some stations also. 

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WOODHAVEN BOULEVARD

QUEENS MALL

 

 

Woodhaven Boulevard Queens Mall AKA. Woodhaven Blvd-Slattery Plaza (Woodhaven Blvd/Horace Harding Blvd/59th Ave and Queens Blvd)  Opened 12/13/1936:   Local stop, although prior 1930's plans were to convert this station into an express stop, once the line from lower Roosevelt Ave terminal (see Roosevelt Ave/Jackson Heights complex info.) to the Winfield spur and the Rockaways would open.  A close observation at outside both ends of this station does reveal the tunnel wall extends outward to allow space for an island platform.  It never happened so it's still a local stop.  The station was renovated in the 1990's, but thankfully retains the 1930's "Woodhaven Blvd-Slattery Plaza" name tablet and "Horace Harding Blvd" directional signs below the name tablet.  The Queens Center Mall first opened in 1972, but the name conversion on subway maps was not in use until the late 1980's.  There is no direct indoor access to the Mall's entrance across 59th Ave from the F/T mezzanine.  The mezzanine allows crossover from any of the stations' 4 staircases from each platform (total of 8 staircases).  There are 3 street stairs on the F/T side at the western end of the mezzanine.  One staircase leads to north side of Queens Blvd and 59th Ave and is the most heavily used staircase because it is closest to Queens Mall and some bus lines.  The other 2 staircases are through a semi long passageway to the south side of Queens Blvd and both sides of Woodhaven Blvd.  Had the Winfield spur was ever constructed and built, this passageway would most likely be a free transfer to/from the Queens Blvd line and the Winfield/Rockaway line instead.  The P/T side at Horace Harding Blvd has ghost booth and 1 street stair.  Since the construction of the Long Island Expressway in the mid-1950's the station entrance at street level appears to be orphaned, out of character with the rest of the area since there is nothing for 300 feet in any direction and is too close to an expressway exit ramp.  Artwork:  "In Memory of The Lost Battalion" by Pablo Tauler (1996) takes nine support beams in the station's mezzanine and creates different materials, such as stainless steel and other material, to honor the soldiers who served in the 77th Infantry in Yaphank, NY during World War 2.Between Woodhaven and Grand Ave, we see a bellmouth inward; again this was part of the failed Winfield/Rockaway spur.

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GRAND AVENUE

NEWTOWN

 

 

Grand Avenue Newtown (Grand Ave/Broadway at Queens Blvd) Opened 12/13/1936:  Local stop, 4 tracks and 2 side platforms.  Full length mezzanine, however due to the setup of fare control and booth area being at the middle of this mezzanine, crossover is only allowed at the easternmost staircase.    Each side has 2 street stairs, however only the staircases at Grand Ave and Broadway at the western end, are open 24 hours a day.  The other 2 staircases by the crossover are closed at night, however there is HEET access at both ends without having to walk down to the middle of the mezzanine in order to enter fare control.  It is evident from the 2 closed staircases at the Manhattan-bound side, that there were 2 fare control areas, one at each end.  Manhattan-bond side has 4 stairs, plus the 2 closed staircases mentioned, while Jamaica bound side has 5 staircases.  Tile band is a darker shade of blue than the 3 previous stops visited

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ELMHURST AVENUE

 

Elmhurst Avenue (Elmhurst/Britton Avenues on Broadway)  Opened 12/13/1936Local stop, similar setup on the mezzanine area as Grand Avenue, only this time the crossover is allowed at the western end, around an exit staircase (sometimes difficult to spot if you do not use this station on a regular basis.).   Unlike Grand Ave, any staircase can be used to crossover, however you must walk to the western end of the mezzanine in order to do.  A total of 5 street stairs at both ends, fare control is at the middle, showing evidence that there were 2 separated fare control areas.  Staircase at Britton Ave on western end has a small arcade of stores.   Each platform has 7 stairs to/from mezzanine.  Up until the early 1980's, this station was a direct connection with the LIRR's Port Washington branch at the now-abandoned Elmhurst station, about 1/2 block away. 

As we about to enter Roosevelt Ave, we see a semi-sealed tunnel along with what were supposed to be a switch about 800 feet to the north.  This was supposed to be a track way to the Roosevelt Ave terminal station on the lower level of Roosevelt Ave station, we even see the almost finished tunnel making it's descent from the local track.  Again as mentioned before, it was part of the never-built IND extension to the Rockaways via. the Winfield spur.

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ROOSEVELT AVENUE

JACKSON HEIGHTS

 

Roosevelt Avenue Jackson Heights is discussed on the Complexes Page

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65th  STREET

 

 

65th Street (65th Street and Broadway) opened 8/19/1933Local stop, 4 tracks and 2 side platforms.  Tile band is now purple, current and surviving F/T mezzanine is at the eastern end.  I noticed signs to the Forest Hills-bound platform strategically positioned on the wall, instead of hanging over the staircase.  The reason for this was the original 1933 IND tile sign read "Jamaica and Rockaway", meaning the IND went too fast in saying the Winfield/Rockaway spur would be built in advance, yet these signs were never covered until at late as 1998.  The 1933 IND Manhattan-bound tile signs are left intact to this day.  Both sides had fare controls and ghost booths at platform levels at the far western end, opposite end of the current mezzanine, they are sealed.   There are 3 stairs to each platform and 2 street stairs.

As we leave 65h Street, the express tracks are depressed and break away from us, for only for a few stops.  The E and F express now run underneath Northern Blvd, while we continue under Broadway, make a left onto Steinway Street before meeting up with the express trains underneath Northern and Steinway.  The reason for this is Broadway and Steinway Streets are very narrow streets and it would be impossible to align 4 tracks side by side underneath these streets.  The IND was the only one of the 3 NYC transit systems that had the express tracks take a shortcut off the main line, while skipping a few stops, (aside from the BMT use of the Manhattan Bridge).  Only other place along the IND where express train take a mini-shortcut is the section between 7th Ave and Church Ave on the F line in Brooklyn, currently not in active use except for late night and weekend G.O. diversions

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NORTHERN  BOULEVARD

Northern Boulevard (Northern Blvd and Broadway) opened 8/19/1933:  Local stop, 2 tracks and 2 side platforms.  Exit at western end by Northern Blvd and Broadway, fare controls are at platform level so no crossover or crossunder is allowed.  F/T booth is Manhattan bound while Forest Hills booth is open part time, other times, HEET access is required. Each fare control has only 1 street stair.  Closed exits at eastern end on both side, IND direction tile "56th St.", and arrow are left intact on both platforms under the Northern Blvd. tablet.    

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46th  STREET

 

 

46th Street   (46th Street and Broadway) Opened 8/19/1933:  Local stop,  2 tracks and 2 side platforms.  Like Northern Blvd, all fare control areas are at platform level and there is no mezzanine.   Manhattan-bound side has F/T area at 46th Street (western end), and P/T entrance and booth at Newton Ave side.  Forest Hills-bound side has P/T booth with nightly and weekend HEET access and another HEET only entrance (no booth) at Newtown Road side.  Contrary to myth about the area in the center of the platform,  there never was a 3rd exit constructed, the original IND directional signs only have 46th and 48th Streets, no 47th Street is visible or shows signs of being covered

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STEINWAY  STREET

 

 

Steinway Street (Steinway Street, about 200 feet south of Broadway)  Opened  8/19/1933:    Local stop, 2 tracks and 2 side platforms.  There are 2 separate mezzanines at both ends of the station, crossover is allowed on both sides.  F/T side on Steinway Street and about 200 feet south of Broadway with 2 street stairs, while P/T side at 34th Ave and Steinway Street, has booth that is open during Monday-Friday, during the day and evening and weekend HEET access, plus 2 street stairs and 1 stair to each platform.  From the F/T area, there are 2 small staircases on the Manhattan bound side, while the Forest Hills bound side has a single platform wide staircase that makes it easier to exit the station.  Good move by the IND at that time, it is the busiest local station between Queens Plaza and Roosevelt Avenue. Leaving Steinway Street, the same 2 express tracks for the E and F lines are with us again.  We now become 4 tracks again

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36th STREET

 

 

36th Street (36th Street and Northern Blvd)  Opened 8/19/1933:  Local stop, 4 tracks, 2 side platforms, no crossover or crossunder is present, so you have to go to either Queens Plaza or Steinway Street if you need to double back.  Manhattan-bound side has platform level mezzanine and 3 street stairs, one of which stretches out 1 block to the north at 37th Street, via a platform-level passageway.  One HEET is available so a MetroCard or Single ride ticket can be used to enter the station without taking the long walk down to the main fare control area.  The Forest Hills bound side has 2 mezzanines, north end is HEET access, south end has P/T booth.  Both ends have 1 street stair to exit.   Route selector punch boxes are found at the Manhattan-bound local and express tracks, this location is where F trains divert to 21st Street Queensbridge.

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QUEENS PLAZA

 

Queens Plaza (Jackson Ave, at Bridge Plaza South/Queens Blvd) opened 8/19/1933: This station has undergone a full scale renovation by Arena Construction . 4 tracks, 2 island platforms along curved section. ADA access is also planned for this station. Tile band is purple, but is expected to be replaced with new walls. Before the renovation, the station had full length mezzanine (inside and outside fare control) with as many as 3 booths. F/T booth is near the center of the mezzanine has 3 street stairs and outside passage to 2 more street stairs at south end, near ghost booth. The old-style change booth was in place as recent as 1998 before it was subsequently removed. 2 of the outside entrances were redone to match the color of the NYC DOT indoor parking lot structure, when it was constructed in 1975. The P/T booth has 2 street stairs and 1 stair to each platform. A station facility now blocks the passage between P/T and F/T fare control areas inside fare control, thus the mezzanine is divided in half (consistent with other IND mezzanine reconfigurations). But the F/.T area now boasts of balconies that allow you to see the local trains and platforms down below, it didn’t have this unique feature prior to the renovation. There are 3 stairs to each platform from the F/T end, 2 stairs in between both fare control areas were removed during the renovation process.

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23rd  STREET

ELY AVENUE

 

23rd Street Ely Avenue is discussed on the complexes page

Manhattan Tile Band

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LEXINGTON AVENUE/

   53rd  STREET

Lexington Avenue/ 53rd Street is discussed on the complexes page

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5thAVENUE-  53rd  STREET

 

 

5th Avenue/ 53rd Street opened 8/19/1933 and has two one track levels with the platform on the South side. A tower is on the south end of the upper platform which serves trains to lower Manhattan and Brooklyn while the lower level serves trains to Queens. The north exit leads to Madison Avenue while the south leads to Fifth Avenue. Escalators are used to access the platform from the mezzanine and the lower platform from the upper platform. The station has a hint of refrigerator tile as if they could not decide. It has been renovated. The upper platform is in a tube design. Leaving this station, the E trains turn off before we enter the next station and B, D and F Join the line. The tower on the upper level controls this junction.

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47th-  50th  STREET

ROCKEFELLER CENTER

 

47th- 50th Street Rockefeller Center (Ave of the Americas, between West 47th and West 50th Streets) Opened 12/15/1940: Very large station, it is an express stop along the prestigious Avenue of the Americas, with 4 tracks and 2 island platforms. Ordinarily,  we would be arriving on the local track. Because of the tricky "T" shaped line configuration involving the E, F, V and B/D lines traveling in different directions, southbound express and local trains come in on opposite sides, the B and D express trains use the local track, while F and V trains use the express track. Station has numerous passageways and exits, a total count of at least 14 entrances from street level alone, were taken. This does not include several passageways through Rockefeller Center, all outside fare control. F/T booth is at north end of full-length mezzanine, at West 49th Street, with 1 passageway through Rockefeller Center on the East side, and another set of passageways through various Concourse levels of office buildings along the west side of Avenue of the Americas. A passageway to one northern P/T staircase leads to Radio City Music Hall/West 50th Street and is open late during evening performances. Another passageway along west side of 49th Street was recently extended to connect with the BMT 49th St station on the N, R and W lines (no free transfer). Middle fare control at West 48th Street has ghost booth and all-day HEET access. South fare control at West 47th St has P/T booth and more staircases. Eagle eye movie fans who saw the 1976 thriller "Marathon Man", will note the old KK rush hour subway route on a street entrance of the east side of Ave of the Americas and West 47th Street, before the routes’ demise. Each platform has 7 stairs to mezzanine, the north end of the N/B platform has an active tower, and is depressed about 10 feet below the S/B platform. This is to prepare the lines to be branched out towards the Bronx and Queens. Color band is red, with dark brown borders, "47" and "50" alternate each other below the tile band

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42nd  STREET

BRYANT PARK

42nd Street Bryant Park is discussed on the complexes page

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34th  STREET

HERALD SQUARE

 

34th Street Herald Square is discussed on the complexes page

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23th  STREET

23rd Street (23rd Street and 6th Avenue)  Opened 12/15/1940:  Local stop, 2 tracks along 2 separate side platforms.  Because the Hudson and Manhattan tunnels (now PATH) were constructed over 40 years prior to the IND, the local platforms do not allow any crossover or cross under, nor was any mezzanine ever constructed at this station (there is a mezzanine at 14th Street station, though.)  The F and V use the 2 outside tracks while inside the walls, the PATH trains use the 2 inner tracks.   The B and D express tracks are way below the PATH tracks, and were constructed using the "deep-bore" tunneling method in the mid 1960's.  Each mezzanine has 4 street stairs and a direct indoor entrance to the 23rd Street PATH station.  2 of the 4 entrances on each side appear to be part of the original 1911 PATH entrances.  Tile band is lime green.  The tile band on the track walls appears to be obscured by support beams directly underneath 23rd Street.

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14th  STREET

 

 

14th Street is discussed on the complexes page

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WEST 4th  STREET

WASHINGTON SQUARE

 

West 4th Street (Ave of the Americas between West 3rd St and Waverly Place) Upper level opened 9/10/1932, Lower level opened 12/15/1940. has four tracks on the upper level, serving A,( see A Lefferts and A Rockaway) C and E trains, a lower Mezzanine and then a lower level serving B, D, F and V trains. The lower Mezzanine is full width and length and also holds numerous offices for NYCT. The north end of the upper level has exits to the street. The south end of the upper level ramps up to a crossover and a booth. Full ADA is in progress via the south end. A tower is at the south end of the southbound lower level platform. The North exit leads to West Eighth Street and the south to west Third Street. The exit to west Fourth Street has been removed. The station has a secondary name of Washington

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BROADWAY LAFAYETTE

 

Broadway Lafayette (West Houston Street between Broadway and Lafayette Ave) Opened 10/1/1936 Station has free transfer to IRT Downtown 6 train (4 trains stop here during late nights) at east end, and is approx 3 levels deep. Renovated by a contractor, it still lacks the passageway from IND level to the Uptown IRT side and is the only transfer point where access is restricted to one-way. Over the years, there were plans on the drawing boards to create a free transfer from the IND level to the Uptown IRT side at Bleecker Street, the plans keep getting shelved, mostly a lack of funding in the MTA’s Capital Program. The 2005-2009 MTA Capital Program makes allowances to design and build the free transfer from the east end of the IND platform. This area appears to be an entrance at one time that apparently never was finished; it is sealed as a false wall. The relatively high ceiling at the same end indicates a ramp was planned somewhere also. This station features only 1 F/T fare control area at Broadway and West Houston, with 2 street stairs. Before the renovation, the fare control was situated in the middle, between the 2 Broadway entrances and the Lafayette Ave entrance. The Lafayette Ave entrance on the south side is currently 24/7 HEET access. A new entrance and booth on the North side of Lafayette Ave and Houston was constructed during the renovation, the booth fell victim to the 2003 ax, as is now listed a ghost booth and part-time HEET access. There is an intermediate level between the mezzanine/IRT level and platform level; it contains artwork on the columns. "Signal" by Mel Chin (1998) uses various materials to create a lighted appearance at the bottom of the column. There are 3 stairs from each platform to intermediate level and an additional 2 stairs from intermediate to mezzanine level. At the far western end (due north in accordance to lines traveled) is another set of stairs (1 for each side) that lead directly up to fare control, 3 levels and a steep walk up. 

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ESSEX  STREET

 

Essex Street opened 7/4/1908 and is being renovated by Cab Associates and is discussed on the complexes page 

Brooklyn Tile Band

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MARCY AVENUE

 

Marcy Avenue (on Broadway at Marcy Avenue) opened 9/16/1888 and has three tracks and two wall platforms is in the final stages of renovation which extended the platform level station houses over the street, added south exits on the northbound platform and added HEETs to the southbound south exit. The station is now full ADA. Leaving this station we see a short section of track continuing straight which once lead to the Broadway ferry Spur. The line now runs over the Williamsburg Bridge via a separate bridge between the two roadway bridges. Sources with the NYC DOT indicate that this bridge is really three bridges in one: The Brooklyn bound bridge (4 lanes), the subway structure, and the Manhattan bound bridge. 

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FLUSHING AVENUE

 

Flushing Avenue (On Broadway at Flushing Avenue) opened 9/16/1888 and has three tracks and two wall platforms. The north exit leads to Marcus Garvey Blvd and is an emergency exit. The south exit has full ADA and leads to Flushing Avenue. The elevators are cantilevered over the sides of the structure. There is no art glass as of this writing but plywood panels suggest where art glass might be installed. ADA is present since the station is near Woodhull Hospital. Sections of windscreen have mesh panels to allow a view of the streets.

idge (4 lanes). The bridge has an ADA walkway over the subway tracks until the Anchorages when it divides into two walkways to Brooklyn. The subway tracks descend into the subway and we enter our next station. For a discussion of the spur see the JJ page 

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HEWES  STREET

 

Hewes Street (On Broadway at Hooper Street) opened 9/16/1888 and has three tracks and two wall platforms. The north exits leads to Hewes Street and is an emergency exit. The south exit leads to Hooper Street and has a crossunder. The art glass features random geometric shapes and is based on shapes found in Dress patterns. It is entitled El in 16 notes and is by Mara Held. This station has 16 sections of art.  

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LORIMER STREET

 

Lorimer Street (On Broadway at Lorimer Street) opened 9/16/1888 and has three tracks and two wall platforms. The north exit has been reopened (with no crossunder) to Wallabout Street while the south exit leads to Lorimer Street with a crossunder. The art glass features a floral and vines theme. Some sections of the windscreen features mesh to allow a view of the streets below. 

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FLUSHING AVENUE

 

Flushing Avenue (On Broadway at Flushing Avenue) opened 9/16/1888 and has three tracks and two wall platforms. The north exit leads to Marcus Garvey Blvd and is an emergency exit. The south exit has full ADA and leads to Flushing Avenue. The elevators are cantilevered over the sides of the structure. There is no art glass as of this writing but plywood panels suggest where art glass might be installed. ADA is present since the station is near Woodhull Hospital. Sections of windscreen have mesh panels to allow a view of the streets.

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BROADWAY

MYRTLE AVENUE

 

(Broadway/)Myrtle Avenue on the current M Line (on Myrtle Avenue at Broadway) opened on 12/19/1889 . There is a crossunder at the center along with one stairway on the southbound platform which is for access to the tower and once accessed the upper level platform which served the MJ Train which used to run further south on Myrtle Avenue to Jay Street in Downtown Brooklyn. The line in even earlier times ran over the Brooklyn Bridge to Park Row (City Hall Park) in Manhattan. For further info on the torn down M Sections see www.nycsubway.org and old M Train The M now runs with the J train from Here to Manhattan and ends on the middle track late nights, weekends and holidays. Art glass here is entitled "Jamaica under the El" by Verna Hart and was installed in 1999. This station is renovated. Across the mezzanine area and underneath the Manhattan bound track is another mezzanine with ghost  booth and one staircase to the Northeast corner on Broadway by Myrtle Avenue. This area was abandoned and later removed during the renovation, however you can see this abandoned exit in the film "Ghost"(1990 where Patrick Swayze exits Myrtle Avenue station via this abandoned staircase. and has three tracks and two island platforms. There is a crossunder at the center along with one stairway on the southbound platform (And a removed stairway on the northbound platform) which is for access to the tower and once accessed the upper level platform which served the M Train which used to run further south on Myrtle Avenue to Jay Street in Downtown Brooklyn. The line in even earlier times ran over the Brooklyn Bridge to Park Row (City Hall Park) in Manhattan. For further info on the demolished M Sections see www.nycsubway.org and Old M Train. The M now runs with the  J train from Here to Manhattan and ends on the middle track late nights, weekends and holidays. Art glass here is entitled "Jamaica under the El" by Verna Hart and was installed in 1999. This station is renovated. For a discussion of stations to Park Row see the Old M page. During rush hours some trains ran to Jay Street and others ran over the Williamsburg Bridge via today’s route. The lightweight trains ran to Jay Street while the heavyweight trains ran via today’s route. R160 trains announce this stop as Myrtle Avenue Broadway, and most documents call it Myrtle Broadway. This site will call it Broadway/ Myrtle in memory of the old upper level station discussed on the old M page. Common public usage agrees with our naming. 

 

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EVERGREEN AVENUE

Evergreen Avenue was removed when the third track (which was never used) was added.
It had an island platform. 

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CENTRAL AVENUE

 

Central Avenue (on Myrtle Avenue at Central Avenue) opened on 12/19/1889 and has two wall platforms and two tracks with space for a third track (now removed which was used by lightweight trains once running on the portion of the M train now removed to Jay Street in Brooklyn.) This station needs TLC and has a wood Mezzanine and metal canopies. There is a removed South exit. South of this station the two trackways from the removed portion merge with the tracks from the in use level of the next station which are at a grade level crossing and rise to meet the two trackways to form the two tracks and space for center track structure. 

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KNICKERBOCKER AVENUE

 

Knickerbocker Avenue (on Myrtle Avenue at Knickerbocker Avenue) opened on 12/19/1889 and has two wall platforms and two tracks with space for a third track (now removed which was used by lightweight trains once running on the portion of the M train now removed to Jay Street in Brooklyn.) This station needs TLC and has a wood Mezzanine and metal canopies. There is a removed South exit. 

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MYRTLE / WYCKOFF AVENUES

 

Myrtle/Wyckoff Avenues (at the intersection of Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues) opened on 12/19/1889 and is discussed on the Complexes Page

Queens Tile Band

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SENECA AVENUE

 

Seneca Avenue (On Palmetto Street at Seneca Avenue) opened on 8/9/1915 and has two tracks and an island platform. An unusual feature here is doors on a landing between platform level and the Mezzanine which is wood. Canopy is metal. 

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FOREST AVENUE

 

Forest Avenue (Intersection of Fairview, Putnam, and Forest Avenues) opened on 8/9/1915 and has two tracks and an island platform. The north exit leads to Forest Avenue while the south exit has been removed and probably leads to Woodward Avenue. Canopy is metal and the Mezzanine is wood. South of the station is a space for a center track. 

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FRESH POND ROAD

 

Fresh Pond Road (At Fresh Pond Road between Putnam and 67th Avenues) opened on 8/9/1915 and has two tracks and a wide island platform with many removed stairways and tapers at both ends. The north exits lead to the booth in the wood Mezzanine and the south to Fresh Pond Road via high exits and stairs leading to ramps to the street. The station is partially over the Fresh Pond Bus Depot. Renovation might be underway. 

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METROPOLITAN AVENUE

 

Metropolitan Avenue (end at Metropolitan Avenue East of Rentar Plaza Mall , about 300 feet west of 69th Street and Metropolitan Avenue) opened on 8/9/1915 and has two tracks and an island platform. It is at grade level with the station house at street level. This station was rebuilt from a wooden station after being destroyed by a fire also effecting Fresh Pond Yard. South of the station are the depressed tracks of the LIRR Bushwick Branch which is no longer used for passenger service. 

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